Tag Archive for pre-columbian

Mayan calendar similar to ancient Chinese Zodiac calendar?

Early contact? Mayan calendar similar to ancient Chinese

Tara MacIsaac
Epoch Times
Thu, 07 Sep 2017 16:17 UTC

th[7]Ancient Mayan and Chinese calendar systems share so many similarities, it is unlikely they developed independently, according to the late David H. Kelley, whose paper on the subject was published posthumously in August.

Kelley was a Harvard-educated archaeologist and epigrapher at the University of Calgary in Canada. He earned fame in the 1960s for major contributions toward deciphering the Mayan script. His article, titled “Asian Components in the Invention of the Mayan Calendar,” was written 30 years ago, but was only recently unearthed and published for the first time in the journal Pre-Columbiana.

In 1980, a major science journal had solicited the article, said Pre-Columbiana’s editor Dr. Stephen Jett. But, Jett said, “the editors rejected it as being overly documented for the journal’s spare format; understandably for so revolutionary an effort, Dave did not wish to weaken the documentation, and he never published the piece elsewhere.” Jett obtained Kelley’s permission to publish it before he died.  Read Complete Report


This video is part of The Alignment Within and explains how The Mayan Calendar Works.
If you’ve ever wondered how The Mayan Calendar Works, this is the film to watch

Source: YouTube  mayancalendarnow  Published on Nov 7, 2012

The Chinese Zodiac is a 12 year cycle symbolized by the 12 animals. Each animal has a different personality and characteristics that influence a person’s personality, success, and happiness.

Source: YouTube  videosvibes   Uploaded on Aug 3, 2009

Dig a little Deeper: Mayan , Ancient Chinese


The Truth about Columbus and the Founding of America

from Before its News

By JG Vibes
November 21, 2012

The article below is an excerpt from the new book Alchemy of the Modern Renaissance, Find a full table of contents and full breakdown of all 87 chapters here

Contrary to the Europeans claims that the Americas were a vast uninhabited wilderness before western “discovery”, there was actually a massive native population that numbered in the hundreds of millions.

Traces of this large population seemed easy enough to destroy at first, considering the natives put a great deal of care into making as little an impact on their environment as possible.

However, as time passes archeologists are continuing to uncover evidence that the pre Columbus civilizations were much more advanced and populated then the historical record tells us. . . . Read Complete Report

from youtube

Trailer: Columbus didn’t discover us

Published on May 30, 2012

A moving testimony about the impact of the Columbus legacy on the lives of indigenous people from North, South, and Central America. PRESS TV Documentaries


This Day in History – Aug 10, 1846: Smithsonian Institution created

Photo: Smithsonian Institution Credit: Peter Griffin Source

from History.com

After a decade of debate about how best to spend a bequest left to America from an obscure English scientist, President James K. Polk signs the Smithsonian Institution Act into law.

In 1829, James Smithson died in Italy, leaving behind a will with a peculiar footnote. In the event that his only nephew died without any heirs, Smithson decreed that the whole of his estate would go to “the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an Establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” Smithson’s curious bequest to a country that he had never visited aroused significant attention on both sides of the Atlantic. . . . Read Complete Report

Invited Comment by Rick Osmon

Dennis has invited me to provide a bit of commentary on this particular story because he knows I continue to express profound doubt in the top level integrity of the Smithsonian Institution.

The Smithsonian is unique in several respects. It is considered by Federal law to be a private institution, yet when it goes to collect specimens it claims it carries the weight of law, in some cases, to force collection.

The Smithsonian claims to house in its collection more than 136 million artifacts, yet, when one inquires Read more