Scientists Find New Primitive Mineral in Meteorite

Photo:  The Alpha-Monocerotid meteor outburst in 1995. The Perseid meteor shower, usually the richest meteor shower of the year, peaks in August. Over the course of an hour, a person watching a clear sky from a dark location might see as many as 50-100 meteors. Meteors are actually pieces of rock that have broken off a comet and continue to orbit the Sun. The Earth travels through the comet debris in its orbit. As the small pieces enter the Earth’s atmosphere, friction causes them to burn up. CREDIT: NASA SOURCE Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

from Science Daily

ScienceDaily (June 26, 2012) — In 1969, an exploding fireball tore through the sky over Mexico, scattering thousands of pieces of meteorite across the state of Chihuahua. More than 40 years later, the Allende meteorite is still serving the scientific community as a rich source of information about the early stages of our solar system’s evolution. Recently, scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) discovered a new mineral embedded in the space rock — one they believe to be among the oldest minerals formed in the solar system. . . . Read Complete Report

Sample of the Allende Metorite – Carbonaceous chondrite type CV3 magnified 20x

from youtube

Published on Apr 26, 2012 by

Carbonaceous chondrites or C chondrites are a class of chondritic meteorites comprising at least 7 known groups and many ungrouped meteorites. They include some of the most primitive known meteorites. C chondrites represent only a small proportion (4.6%)of meteorite falls. The specimen in the video is a sample of the Allende meteorite. It is a 3.3 gram partial slice in my personal collection.

Published on Apr 26, 2012 by Edmk2009

Carbonaceous chondrites or C chondrites are a class of chondritic meteorites comprising at least 7 known groups and many ungrouped meteorites. They include some of the most primitive known meteorites. C chondrites represent only a small proportion (4.6%)of meteorite falls. The specimen in the video is a sample of the Allende meteorite. It is a 3.3 gram partial slice in my personal collection.

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